Table 19-2.

Angina Pectoris

Population GroupPrevalence, 2012, Age ≥20 yIncidence of Stable AP, Age ≥45 yHospital Discharges, 2010, All Ages*
Both sexes8 200 000 (3.3%)565 00022 000
Males4 000 000 (3.4%)370 00012 000
Females4 200 000 (3.2%)195 00010 000
NH white males3.4%
NH white females2.9%
NH black males3.3%
NH black females5.0%
Hispanic males3.2%
Hispanic females3.8%
  • AP is chest pain or discomfort that results from insufficient blood flow to the heart muscle. Stable AP is predictable chest pain on exertion or under mental or emotional stress. The incidence estimate is for AP without myocardial infarction.

  • AP indicates angina pectoris; ellipses, data not available; and NH, non-Hispanic.

  • * There were 56 000 days of care for discharges of patients with AP from short-stay hospitals in 2010.

  • Sources: Prevalence: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2009 to 2012 (National Center for Health Statistics) and National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; percentages for racial/ethnic groups are age adjusted for US adults ≥20 years of age. AP includes people who either answered “yes” to the question of ever having angina or AP or who were diagnosed with Rose angina (the Rose questionnaire is only administered to survey participants >40 years of age). Estimates from National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2009 to 2012 (National Center for Health Statistics) were applied to 2010 population estimates (≥20 years of age). Incidence: AP uncomplicated by a myocardial infarction or with no myocardial infarction (Framingham Heart Study [the original cohort and the Offspring Cohort 1986–2009], National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute). Hospital discharges: National Hospital Discharge Survey, National Center for Health Statistics; data include those inpatients discharged alive, dead, or status unknown.