Table 8-1.

High TC and LDL-C and Low HDL-C

Population GroupPrevalence of TC ≥200 mg/dL, 2011–2014 Age ≥20 yPrevalence of TC ≥240 mg/dL, 2011–2014 Age ≥20 yPrevalence of LDL-C ≥130 mg/ dL, 2011–2014 Age ≥20 yPrevalence of HDL-C <40 mg/dL, 2011–2014 Age ≥20 y
Both sexes, n (%)*94 600 000 (39.7)28 500 000 (11.9)71 300 000 (30.3)44 000 000 (18.7)
Males, n (%)*42 300 000 (37.0)12 100 000 (10.6)34 000 000 (30.0)32 100 000 (27.9)
Females, n (%)*52 300 000 (42.0)16 400 000 (13.0)37 300 000 (30.4)11 900 000 (10.0)
NH white males, %37.010.829.328.4
NH white females, %43.413.832.110.3
NH black males, %32.67.329.920.7
NH black females, %36.19.627.98.0
Hispanic males, %43.113.636.630.7
Hispanic females, %41.212.528.711.8
NH Asian males, %39.910.829.225.0
NH Asian females, %40.511.225.06.7
  • Prevalence of TC ≥200 mg/dL includes people with TC ≥240 mg/dL. In adults, levels of 200 to 239 mg/dL are considered borderline high. Levels of ≥240 mg/dL are considered high. HDL-C indicates high-density lipoprotein cholesterol; LDL-C, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol; NH, non-Hispanic; and TC, total cholesterol.

  • * Total data for TC are for Americans ≥20 years of age. Data for LDL-C, HDL-C, and all racial/ethnic groups are age adjusted for age ≥20 years.

  • Source for TC ≥200 mg/dL, ≥240 mg/dL, LDL-C, and HDL-C: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (2011–2014), National Center for Health Statistics, and National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. Estimates from National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2011 to 2014 (National Center for Health Statistics) were applied to 2014 population estimates.